The Latest: MSU president says settlement helps healingMay 17, 2018 5:06pm

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on Michigan State University's $500 million settlement with victims of former sports doctor Larry Nassar (all times local):

1 p.m.

Michigan State University's interim president says the $500 million settlement with victims of former campus sports doctor Larry Nassar is important to help both the survivors and the school heal.

John Engler wrote a letter to the campus community Thursday, a day after the deal with 332 accusers was announced. He apologized for what Nassar put the women and girls through and said reaching a prompt and successful resolution for their lawsuits had been a top priority since he became president in February.

He says all of Michigan State's insurers participated in the mediation and "we expect all of them to fulfill their contractual obligations." He says he will work with the school's governing board in the days ahead to develop a strategy to pay the settlement.

Engler says 31 victims were MSU students. He says the settlement will help survivors and their families avoid years of litigation and begin the healing they seek, and will let the university keep making changes designed to prevent sexual misconduct and assaults

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1 a.m.

Michigan State University reached a $500 million settlement with hundreds of women and girls who say they were sexually assaulted by former sports doctor Larry Nassar.

The deal was announced Wednesday by the university and lawyers for 332 victims.

Brian Breslin, chairman of the school's governing board, says Michigan State is "truly sorry" for what Nassar's victims and families went through. The university didn't disclose how it will pay for the settlement.

Also, state regulators filed a complaint against Dr. William Strampel, who was dean of Michigan State's medical school and Nassar's former boss. Strampel is accused of failing to properly supervise Nassar.

Nassar sexually assaulted women and girls while working at Michigan State. He also worked for USA Gymnastics, which trains athletes for the Olympics.

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