The Latest: Chaffetz unsure if Comey documents existMay 18, 2017 10:08pm

ALPINE, Utah (AP) — The Latest on Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz resigning from office (all times local):

4:00 p.m.

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he's not sure if documents exist to confirm that President Donald Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to shut down the FBI investigation into ousted National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

Chaffetz said Thursday in Utah that he hopes to find out from the U.S. Department of Justice within the next few weeks if they exist and if they'll share them with the House Oversight Committee he chairs.

He made the comments from his home in Utah after announcing he'll resign from Congress and leave by June 30.

The Republican says he hasn't yet spoken to fired FBI Director James Comey about his invitation for Comey to testify next week at an oversight committee hearing.

Chaffetz is the chair of the committee that has promised to look into Trump's ties to Russia.

Chaffetz says he's skeptical about the report about the Comey memos but was concerned enough to launch the probe.

He says somebody else can lead the committee's work when he leaves Congress.

___

1:05 p.m.

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he will resign from Congress on June 30, raising questions about the probe of President Donald Trump's ties to Russia.

The Republican said in a letter Thursday to his constituents that he and his wife have agreed "the time has come for us to move on from this part of our life."

The statement does not mention the investigation he's overseeing as the U.S. House Oversight Committee's chair into President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey.

The letter also doesn't mention Chaffetz's future plans, including a possible run for Utah governor.

Chaffetz says the reality of having spent more than 1,500 nights away from his family over eight years has hit him harder than before.

He says he and his wife will be empty nesters soon and it seems like time to turn a page.

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10:55 a.m.

A top Utah state lawmaker says that U.S. Rep. Jason Chaffetz is expected to leave office by the end of June.

Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes said Wednesday in a caucus meeting that the Republican Chaffetz is expected to announce his resignation soon and that it would take effect by June 30.

Chaffetz representatives on Thursday did not return telephone and email messages seeking comment.

Chaffetz said last month that he would not seek re-election in 2018 and that he was considering leaving office early.

Hughes' chief of staff Greg Hartley said in a text Thursday that Hughes "has heard that he (Chaffetz) could be out of office as soon as the end of June. He doesn't know for certain."

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