The Latest: Trump's lawyer files papers in Cohen caseApril 16, 2018 2:35am

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump-Russia probe (all times local):

9 p.m.

An attorney for President Donald Trump has told a federal judge that prosecutors should not get to study evidence seized from his personal lawyer until he has a chance to review the material and identify items that might be subject to attorney-client privilege.

Attorney Joanna Hendon made the request in a letter submitted late Sunday to federal Judge Kimba Wood in a Manhattan court.

Federal officials raided Trump lawyer Michael Cohen's residences, office and safety deposit box, taking records and electronic devices including two cellphones.

Cohen has been ordered to appear Monday in federal court in New York for arguments over last week's raid.

Prosecutors say they are investigating Cohen's personal business activities, but haven't said what law they think he's broken.

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This story has been corrected to reflect that it was Trump's lawyer that filed the legal documents Sunday, not Cohen's lawyer.

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10 a.m.

President Donald Trump says all lawyers are now "deflated and concerned" by the FBI raid on his personal attorney Michael Cohen's home and office.

He tweeted Sunday: "I have many (too many!) lawyers and they are probably wondering when their offices, and even homes, are going to be raided with everything, including their phones and computers, taken. All lawyers are deflated and concerned!"

Cohen has been ordered to appear Monday in federal court in New York for arguments over last week's raid. Cohen's attorneys want prosecutors ordered to temporarily halt an examination of the seized material, saying it's protected by attorney-client privilege.

The raid sought information on a $130,000 payment made to porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she had sex with a married Trump in 2006

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