GOP women chafe at Trump's mixed signals on abuse chargesFebruary 14, 2018 8:47pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump White House's handling of abuse charges against men in its midst is frustrating prominent Republican women as the party's yearslong struggle to attract female voters stretches into the 2018 midterm elections.

"It's the mixed signals. They've just got to be stronger, more consistent, clearer in the message" to women, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., said Tuesday. "It's difficult being a Republican woman to have to fight through that all the time."

The thrice-married Trump added a new chapter to his difficult history with female voters in the past week by refusing to offer public words of support to the ex-wives of two senior presidential aides. Rob Porter, the president's staff secretary, resigned last week after ex-wives Colbie Holderness and Jennifer Willoughby came forward with allegations of abuse. DailyMail.com published photos of Holderness with a black eye. Porter denied harming either of them.

A second White House official, Trump speechwriter David Sorensen, left the White House last Friday after his ex-wife, Jessica Corbett, described physical abuse that included being thrown into a wall and burned by a cigarette. He, too, denied the allegations.

After initially balking, Trump spoke out on Wednesday.

"I am totally opposed to domestic violence of any kind," he said. "Everyone knows that and it almost wouldn't even have to be said."

But for Republicans, who are defending their House and Senate majorities and have long struggled to appeal to female voters, it did have to be said. Women, especially, were concerned after Trump on Saturday tweeted support for Porter and other accused men.

"Peoples lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation. Some are true and some are false. Some are old and some are new," Trump tweeted. "There is no recovery for someone falsely accused - life and career are gone. Is there no such thing any longer as Due Process?"

House Republicans are investigating how Porter was allowed to work at the White House under an interim security clearance despite the abuse allegations.

"C'mon, clearly we all should be condemning domestic violence," House Speaker Paul Ryan told reporters earlier Wednesday, rolling his eyes. "And if a person who commits domestic violence gets in the government then there's a breakdown in the system" that needs to be addressed.

One in three women and one in four men are affected by domestic violence every year, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Jody Rushton, president of the National Federation of Republican Women, said in a statement that domestic violence "continues to be a very serious and pernicious problem in our country." The federation "believes America as a whole should always support victims of abuse, not just when it's politically expedient to do so."

Others were more direct in their criticism of the Trump White House.

"I'm extremely disappointed in this situation. Abuse is never OK," Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, said on CNN Tuesday.

The president still hammers at his vanquished 2016 rival, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, whom he once threatened to throw in prison. His support among Republicans wavered just before Election Day with the release of an "Access Hollywood" recording in which Trump can be heard bragging about grabbing women by their genitals. And more than a dozen women have accused Trump of harassing or assaulting them. Trump called them liars and said he'd sue them — though that hasn't happened.

The White House says Americans issued their verdict on all of that when they elected Trump. Some 42 percent of women voted for Trump, while 56 percent went for Clinton. That's similar to the gender gap for Bill Clinton in 1996 and Barack Obama in 2012. Among registered voters, more than half of women — 54 percent — identify as Democrats or lean Democratic, compared with 38 percent who say they align with Republicans, according to 2016 Pew Research Center statistics.

But winning over women has long been an uphill battle for the GOP, and there are signs in recent polling that Trump is making it more difficult.

Most recent surveys have shown Democrats running ahead in national preference polls for Congress. One survey this month by Marist College showed Democrats leading by 21 percentage points among women. Another by Monmouth University released Jan. 31 showed Democrats up by 13 percentage points among female voters. In both polls, about 6 in 10 women disapproved of Trump.

Some GOP activists said Trump's approach risks alienating moderate Republican women.

"The party and party leadership has had so many opportunities to try to right its wrongs, and Donald Trump's wrongs, with women, to take a stand ... and they haven't," said Meghan Milloy, co-founder of Republican Women for Progress, previously called Republicans for Hillary. The GOP, she said, "is going to start losing women."

Jennifer Horn, former New Hampshire Republican chairwoman, added, "Every single time the president tries to excuse a man who has assaulted women, it makes it harder and harder for our candidates to run credible campaigns."

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Peoples reported from New York. Associated Press writer Emily Swanson contributed to this report.

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Follow Kellman and Peoples on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/APLaurieKellman and http://www.twitter.com/SPPeoples

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